KENOSHA'S

MOST WANTED

KECEY MACKEY

Updated Weekly




 

 

Suicide is a problem within the law enforcement community due to the daily stress and rigors an officer is subjected to.  To learn more, please view the Kenosha Police Department's newest video about Law Enforcement Suicide Prevention.  If you know of someone in need of assistance, please reach out to get the needed help.


Chief John W. Morrissey has released the Kenosha Police Department 2013 Annual Report.  Please check out the report to see what the Kenosha Police Department did in 2013.


To read about Wisconsin's Conceal Carry Law, click here.


The Kenosha Police Dept. Honor Guard is a member organization in the Wisconsin Honor Guard Association


 

The Build of a Kenosha Police Squad Car

 

Check out how one of our squads is built. Click here to see the video.

Identity Theft

Identity theft, the theft of personal information for the purpose of committing crimes, is becoming more prevalent. Help protect yourself from identity theft by taking a moment to read this information. Learn what you can do to keep thieves from stealing your money, applying for credit and charging merchandise – all in your name.

Download the Kenosha Police Department Identety Theft Brochure.

Is someone trying to steal your identity?

Do not respond to any suspicious requests.

Look at what is being claimed and whether or not it makes sense. 

Call the company directly and ask why they’re requesting the information.

 

How thieves steal your identity

Are you a victim?

Theft – taking wallets or purses and using IDs and bank/credit cards.

Mail – stealing mail or sending fraudulent mailers.

Phone – making unsolicited calls requesting private information.

Trash – digging through trash for receipts, statements, credit card offers, etc.

E-mail – sending fraudulent e-mails that look like legitimate corporate communication. “Phishing” scams involve unsolicited professional-looking e-mails sent by thieves that alert customers to provide their confidential information (Social Security number, account numbers, PINs). Identity thieves then use this captured information to commit crimes under the victim’s identity.

Online – creating counterfeit websites to capture your confidential information.

 

If you think your identity may have been stolen, contact the following immediately:

1. Credit Bureaus: Alert the credit bureaus of the fraudulent activity that has occurred.

Equifax 1-800-525-6285
Experian 1-888-397-3742
TransUnion 1-800-680-7289

2. Other Financial Institutions: Notify all of your banks or credit issuers.

4. Federal Trade Commission: File a complaint with the FTC by calling the Identity Theft Hotline toll-free at 1-877-IDTHEFT (438-4338).

How you can protect yourself

Monitor your bank account and credit card activity.

Guard your personal information. Don’t carry your Social Security card or account numbers in your purse or wallet.

Shred all confidential paperwork before discarding – including statements, applications and old bank/credit cards.

Review your monthly statements carefully and check for any unauthorized transactions.

Don’t provide confidential information via e-mail or phone. If you need to provide this information, be sure you initiate the phone call and/or use a secure online session for e-mail.

Check your credit reports on a regular basis to verify all inquiries and accounts.

For further information, click here Department of Justice and /or, please contact the following: 

U.S. Department of Justice
Criminal Division/Fraud Section
10th & Constitution Ave., NW
Bond Building, Suite 4100
Washington, DC 20530

  • Main number:  (202) 514-7023
  • Fax number:    (202) 514-7021